Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning
Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning
Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning
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Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning - TED-Ed

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How good are you with money? What about reading people’s emotions? How healthy are you, compared to other people you know? Knowing how our skills stack up against others is useful in many ways. But psychological research suggests that we’re not very good at evaluating ourselves accurately. In fact, we frequently overestimate our own abilities. David Dunning describes the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Lesson by David Dunning, directed by Wednesday Studio, music and sound by Tom Drew.

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Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan, Alexandra Panzer, Jen, Ellen Spertus, Ryan Mehendale, Mary Sawyer, Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Hazel Lam, Tan YH, Be Owusu, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario, Katie Winchester, Michel Reyes, Dominik Kugelmann, Siamak H, Stephen A. Wilson, Manav Parmar, Jhiya Brooks, David Lucsanyi, Querida Owens.

The language of lying — Noah Zandan

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-language-of-lying-noah-zandan We hear anywhere from 10 to 200 lies a day. And although we’ve spent much of our history coming up with ways to detect these lies by tracking physiological changes in their tellers, these methods have proved unreliable. Is there a more direct approach? Noah Zandan uses some famous examples of lying to illustrate how we might use communications science to analyze the lies themselves. Lesson by Noah Zandan, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

Can you solve the egg drop riddle? - Yossi Elran

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-the-egg-drop-riddle-yossi-elran The city has just opened its one-of-a-kind Faberge Egg Museum, with a single egg displayed on each floor of a 100-story building -- and the world’s most notorious jewel thief already has her eyes on the prize. Can you help the thief formulate a plan that will drop the most expensive egg she can get safely into her waiting truck? Yossi Elran shows how. Lesson by Yossi Elran, directed by Artrake Studio. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Yuh Saito, Sarabeth...

How to stay calm when you know you'll be stressed | Daniel Levitin

You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem. "We all are going to fail now and then," he says. "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be." TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the...

Inside the mind of a master procrastinator | Tim Urban

Tim Urban knows that procrastination doesn't make sense, but he's never been able to shake his habit of waiting until the last minute to get things done. In this hilarious and insightful talk, Urban takes us on a journey through YouTube binges, Wikipedia rabbit holes and bouts of staring out the window -- and encourages us to think harder about what we're really procrastinating on, before we run out of time. For more from Tim Urban, visit Wait But Why: http://www.waitbutwhy.com/ TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers...

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems. Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.

How to practice effectively...for just about anything - Annie Bosler and Don Greene

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-practice-effectively-for-just-about-anything-annie-bosler-and-don-greene Mastering any physical skill takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. But what does practice actually do to make us better at things? Annie Bosler and Don Greene explain how practice affects the inner workings of our brains. Lesson by Annie Bosler and Don Greene, animation by Martina Meštrović.

A brief history of banned numbers - Alessandra King

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-history-of-banned-numbers-alessandra-king They say the pen is mightier than the sword, and authorities have often agreed. From outlawed religious tracts and revolutionary manifestos to censored and burned books, we know the potential power of words to overturn the social order. But as strange as it may seem, some numbers have also been considered dangerous enough to ban. Alessandra King details the history behind illegal numbers. Lesson by Alessandra King, directed by Juan M. Urbina Studios. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Yankai Liu,...

Questions No One Knows the Answers to (Full Version)

In the first of a new TED-Ed series designed to catalyze curiosity, TED Curator Chris Anderson shares his boyhood obsession with quirky questions that seem to have no answers. (Introducing the series "Questions no one knows the answers to") "Questions No One Knows the Answers to" was animated by Andrew Park (http://www.cognitivemedia.co.uk)

Can you solve the three gods riddle? - Alex Gendler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-the-three-gods-riddle-alex-gendler You and your team have crash-landed on an ancient planet. Can you appease the three alien overlords who rule it and get your team safely home? Created by logician Raymond Smullyan, and popularized by his colleague George Boolos, this riddle has been called the hardest logic puzzle ever. Alex Gendler shows how to solve it. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

The Infinite Hotel Paradox - Jeff Dekofsky

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-infinite-hotel-paradox-jeff-dekofsky The Infinite Hotel, a thought experiment created by German mathematician David Hilbert, is a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Easy to comprehend, right? Wrong. What if it's completely booked but one person wants to check in? What about 40? Or an infinitely full bus of people? Jeff Dekofsky solves these heady lodging issues using Hilbert's paradox. Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

What is bipolar disorder? - Helen M. Farrell

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-bipolar-disorder-helen-m-farrell The word bipolar means ‘two extremes.’ For the many millions experiencing bipolar disorder around the world, life is split between two different realities: elation and depression. So what causes this disorder? And can it be treated? Helen M. Farrell describes the root causes and treatments for bipolar disorder. Lesson by Helen M Farrell, animation by Uncle Ginger.

Are you a body with a mind or a mind with a body? - Maryam Alimardani

Download a free audiobook and support TED-Ed's nonprofit mission: http://www.audible.com/teded Check out Cixin Liu's "The Three Body Problem": https://shop.ed.ted.com/collections/ted-ed-book-recommendations/products/the-three-body-problem View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/are-you-a-body-with-a-mind-or-a-mind-with-a-body-maryam-alimardani Our bodies – the physical, biological parts of us — and our minds — the thinking, conscious aspects — have a complicated, tangled relationship. Which one primarily defines you or your self? Are you a body with a mind or a mind with a body? Maryam Alimardani investigates. Lesson by Maryam Alimardani, directed by Ivana Bošnjak & Thomas Johnson. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Shooteram, Catherine Sverko, Nik...

The myth of Prometheus - Iseult Gillespie

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-myth-of-prometheus-iseult-gillespie Before the creation of humanity, the Greek gods won a great battle against a race of giants called the Titans. Most Titans were destroyed or driven to the eternal hell of Tartarus. But the Titan Prometheus, whose name means foresight, persuaded his brother Epimetheus to fight with him on the side of the Gods. Iseult Gillespie shares the myth of Prometheus. Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by Léa Krawczyk. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Yalda A., Susan Herder, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon,...

How to make your writing suspenseful - Victoria Smith

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-make-your-writing-suspenseful-victoria-smith What makes a good horror story? Hideous monsters and fountains of blood might seem like a good place to start, but as horror author H.P. Lovecraft wrote, “The oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” Writers harness that fear not by revealing horrors, but by leaving the audience hanging in a state of suspense. Victoria Smith gives some tips for adding suspense to your writing. Lesson by Victoria Smith, directed by Silvia Prietov. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not...

Why should you read "Macbeth"? - Brendan Pelsue

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should-you-read-macbeth-brendan-pelsue There’s a play so powerful that an old superstition says its name should never be uttered in a theater. A play that begins with witchcraft and ends with a bloody, severed head. A play filled with riddles, prophecies, nightmare visions, and lots of brutal murder. But is it really all that good? Brendan Pelsue explains why you should read (or revisit) "Macbeth." Lesson by Brendan Pelsue, directed by Silvia Prietov. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Delene McCoy, Sammie Goh, Kathryn...

How the food you eat affects your brain - Mia Nacamulli

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-the-food-you-eat-affects-your-brain-mia-nacamulli When it comes to what you bite, chew and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting effect on the most powerful organ in your body: your brain. So which foods cause you to feel so tired after lunch? Or so restless at night? Mia Nacamulli takes you into the brain to find out. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by Private Island.

Why do people join cults? - Janja Lalich

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-people-join-cults-janja-lalich Today, there are thousands of cults around the world. Broadly speaking, a cult is a group or movement with a shared commitment to a usually extreme ideology that’s typically embodied in a charismatic leader. But what exactly differentiates cults from other groups – and why do people join them? Janja Lalich describes how cults recruit and manipulate their members. Lesson by Janja Lalich, animation by Globizco.

How does your body know you're full? - Hilary Coller

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-your-body-know-you-re-full-hilary-coller Hunger claws at your belly. It tugs at your intestines, which begin to writhe, aching to be fed. Being hungry generates a powerful and often unpleasant physical sensation that’s almost impossible to ignore. After you’ve reacted by gorging on your morning pancakes, you start to experience an opposing force: fullness. But how does your body actually know when you’re full? Hilary Coller explains. Lesson by Hilary Coller, directed by Sashko Danylenko. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen,...

Why do people get so anxious about math? - Orly Rubinsten

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-people-get-so-anxious-about-math-orly-rubinsten Have you ever sat down to take a math test and immediately felt your heart beat faster and your palms start to sweat? This is called math anxiety, and if it happens to you, you’re not alone: Researchers think about 20 percent of the population suffers from it. So what’s going on? And can it be fixed? Orly Rubinsten explores the current research and suggests ways to increase math performance. Lesson by Orly Rubinsten, animation by Adriatic Animation.

Why do we dream? - Amy Adkins

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-dream-amy-adkins In the 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamian kings recorded and interpreted their dreams on wax tablets. In the years since, we haven't paused in our quest to understand why we dream. And while we still don’t have any definitive answers, we have some theories. Amy Adkins reveals the top seven reasons why we might dream. Lesson by Amy Adkins, animation by Clamanne Studio.

Why people believe they can’t draw - and how to prove they can | Graham Shaw | TEDxHull

Why is it that so many people think they can’t draw? Where did we learn to believe that? Graham Shaw will shatter this illusion – quite literally - in a very practical way. He’ll demonstrate how the simple act of drawing has the power to make a positive difference in the world. Graham specialises in the art of communication and has helped thousands of people to make important presentations. He is perhaps best known for his use of fast cartoon drawings to communicate ideas and is the author of ‘The Art of Business Communication’. This talk was given at a TEDx event...

Why our IQ levels are higher than our grandparents' | James Flynn

In 1900, only 3% of Americans practiced professions that were deemed "cognitively demanding." Today, 35% of us do, and we have all learned to be flexible in the way that we think about problems. In this fascinating and fast-paced spin through the cognitive history of the 20th century, moral philosopher James Flynn makes the case that changes in the way we think have had surprising (and not always positive) consequences. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18...

How to speak so that people want to listen | Julian Treasure

Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening? Here's Julian Treasure to help you fix that. As the sound expert demonstrates some useful vocal exercises and shares tips on how to speak with empathy, he offers his vision for a sonorous world of listening and understanding. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much...

History’s deadliest colors - J. V. Maranto

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/history-s-deadliest-colors-j-v-maranto When radium was first discovered, its luminous green color inspired people to add it into beauty products and jewelry. It wasn’t until much later that we realized that radium’s harmful effects outweighed its visual benefits. Unfortunately, radium isn’t the only pigment that historically seemed harmless or useful but turned out to be deadly. J. V. Maranto details history’s deadliest colors. Lesson by J. V. Maranto, animation by Juan M. Urbina.