Why do your knuckles pop? - Eleanor Nelsen
Why do your knuckles pop? - Eleanor Nelsen
Why do your knuckles pop? - Eleanor Nelsen
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Why do your knuckles pop? - Eleanor Nelsen - TED-Ed

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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-your-knuckles-pop-eleanor-nelsen

Some people love the feeling of cracking their knuckles, while others cringe at the sound. But what causes that trademark pop? And is it dangerous? Eleanor Nelsen gives the facts behind joint popping.

Lesson by Eleanor Nelsen, animation by Steve Belfer Creative.

Why do we itch? - Emma Bryce

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-itch-emma-bryce The average person experiences dozens of individual itches each day. We’ve all experienced the annoyance of an inconvenient itch — but have you ever pondered why we itch in the first place? Is there actually an evolutionary purpose to the itch, or is it simply there to annoy us? Emma Bryce digs deep into the skin to find out. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Sashko Danylenko.

What causes bad breath? - Mel Rosenberg

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-causes-bad-breath-mel-rosenberg Halitosis is a curse that has plagued humanity since ancient times. But what causes it, and why is it so universally terrifying? Mel Rosenberg outlines the basics of bad breath — and what you can do when it strikes you. Lesson by Mel Rosenberg, animation by Andrew Foerster.

What are those floaty things in your eye? - Michael Mauser

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-are-those-floaty-things-in-your-eye-michael-mauser Sometimes, against a uniform, bright background such as a clear sky or a blank computer screen, you might see things floating across your field of vision. What are these moving objects, and how are you seeing them? Michael Mauser explains the visual phenomenon that is floaters. Lesson by Michael Mauser, animation by Reflective Films.

What makes muscles grow? - Jeffrey Siegel

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-muscles-grow-jeffrey-siegel We have over 600 muscles in our bodies that help bind us together, hold us up, and help us move. Your muscles also need your constant attention, because the way you treat them on a daily basis determines whether they will wither or grow. Jeffrey Siegel illustrates how a good mix of sleep, nutrition and exercise keep your muscles as big and strong as possible. Lesson by Jeffrey Siegel, animation by Brett Underhill.

Why are some people left-handed? - Daniel M. Abrams

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-are-some-people-left-handed-daniel-m-abrams Today, about one-tenth of the world’s population are southpaws. Why are such a small proportion of people left-handed -- and why does the trait exist in the first place? Daniel M. Abrams investigates how the uneven ratio of lefties and righties gives insight into a balance between competitive and cooperative pressures on human evolution. Lesson by Daniel M. Abrams, animation by TED-Ed.

7 SECRET MESSAGES HIDDEN IN POPULAR CARTOONS

CRAFTS & HACKS ► https://goo.gl/hxvYYc We are absolutely sure that everyone likes watching cartoons. If you say no, we don’t believe you. Because, honestly, what could be better than a few minutes back to the childhood? But when you watch your favorite cartoons, you could probably skip small details in the background like the nuances of secondary heroes or the fact that some cartoon character has appeared in a different place. That’s why we decided to watch some popular cartoons one more time and dig deeper into some small details that you most likely haven’t noticed before. Here are 7 strange...

How does your brain respond to pain? - Karen D. Davis

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-your-brain-respond-to-pain-karen-d-davis Ouch! Everyone experiences pain -- but why do some people react to the same painful stimulus in different ways? And what exactly is pain, anyway? Karen D. Davis walks you through your brain on pain, illuminating why the "pain experience" differs from person to person. Lesson by Karen D. Davis, animation by Brett Underhill.

Why incompetent people think they're amazing - David Dunning

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-incompetent-people-think-they-re-amazing-david-dunning How good are you with money? What about reading people’s emotions? How healthy are you, compared to other people you know? Knowing how our skills stack up against others is useful in many ways. But psychological research suggests that we’re not very good at evaluating ourselves accurately. In fact, we frequently overestimate our own abilities. David Dunning describes the Dunning-Kruger effect. Lesson by David Dunning, directed by Wednesday Studio, music and sound by Tom Drew. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be...

Why do we hiccup? - John Cameron

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-hiccup-john-cameron The longest recorded case of hiccups lasted for 68 years … and was caused by a falling hog. While that level of severity is extremely uncommon, most of us are no stranger to an occasional case of the hiccups. But what causes these ‘hics’ in the first place? John Cameron takes us into the diaphragm to find out. Lesson by John Cameron, animation by Black Powder Design.

What happens during a heart attack? - Krishna Sudhir

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-happens-during-a-heart-attack-krishna-sudhir Approximately seven million people around the world die from heart attacks every year. And cardiovascular disease, which causes heart attacks and other problems like strokes, is the world’s leading killer. So what causes a heart attack? Krishna Sudhir examines the leading causes and treatments of this deadly disease. Lesson by Krishna Sudhir, animation by Chadwick Whitehead.

The benefits of good posture - Murat Dalkilinç

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-benefits-of-good-posture-murat-dalkinic Has anyone ever told you, “Stand up straight!” or scolded you for slouching at a family dinner? Comments like that might be annoying—but they’re not wrong. Your posture is the foundation for every movement your body makes and can determine how well your body adapts to the stresses on it. Murat Dalkilinç gives the pros of good posture. Lesson by Murat Dalkilinç, animation by Nadav Arbel.

WARNING:An Amazingly Loud Back Crack And Chiropractic Adjustment By Raleigh NC Chiropractor

Popular Raleigh NC Chiropractor Dr. Jeffrey Gerdes Of Carolina ChiroCare and Rehab Demonstrates A Lumbar And Thoracic Spine Chiropractic Adjustment On A Patient Experiencing Low Back Pain. The Raleigh Chiropractor Also Performs Myofascial Therapy On The Patients Low Back And Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles. This Is Used To Treat Muscle Pain and Joint Pain And Aid In Injury Recovery And Pain Relief. While The Patient's Examination Was Normal She Experienced Frequent Bouts Of Low Back Pain Thought To Be Meniscal Entrapment In The Lumbar Facet Joints. For A Full Detailed Description Of This Treatment Visit Our Blog @ http://carolinachirocare.com/2017/02/22/lumbar-facet-syndrome-what-is-it-how-can-chiropractic-help/ Subscribe To Our...

Why do we dream? - Amy Adkins

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-dream-amy-adkins In the 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamian kings recorded and interpreted their dreams on wax tablets. In the years since, we haven't paused in our quest to understand why we dream. And while we still don’t have any definitive answers, we have some theories. Amy Adkins reveals the top seven reasons why we might dream. Lesson by Amy Adkins, animation by Clamanne Studio.

What happens to our bodies after we die? - Farnaz Khatibi Jafari

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-happens-to-our-bodies-after-we-die-farnaz-khatibi-jafari Since the dawn of humanity, an estimated 100.8 billion people have lived and died, a number that increases by about 0.8% of the world’s population each year. What happens to all of those peoples’ bodies after they die? And will the planet eventually run out of burial space? Farnaz Khatibi Jafari traces the evolution of how humanity has treated bodies and burials. Lesson by Farnaz Khatibi Jafari, animation by Ivana Bošnjak and Thomas Johnson.

What makes tattoos permanent? - Claudia Aguirre

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-tattoos-permanent-claudia-aguirre The earliest recorded tattoo was found on a Peruvian mummy in 6,000 BC. That's some old ink! And considering humans lose roughly 40,000 skin cells per hour, how do these markings last? Claudia Aguirre details the different methods, machines and macrophages (you'll see) that go into making tattoos stand the test of time. Lesson by Claudia Aguirre, animation by TOGETHER.

The language of lying — Noah Zandan

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-language-of-lying-noah-zandan We hear anywhere from 10 to 200 lies a day. And although we’ve spent much of our history coming up with ways to detect these lies by tracking physiological changes in their tellers, these methods have proved unreliable. Is there a more direct approach? Noah Zandan uses some famous examples of lying to illustrate how we might use communications science to analyze the lies themselves. Lesson by Noah Zandan, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

What would happen if you didn’t drink water? - Mia Nacamulli

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-would-happen-if-you-didn-t-drink-water-mia-nacamulli Water is essentially everywhere in our world, and the average human is composed of between 55 and 60% water. So what role does water play in our bodies, and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy? Mia Nacamulli details the health benefits of hydration. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by Chris Bishop.

Is it bad to hold your pee? - Heba Shaheed

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/is-it-bad-to-hold-your-pee-heba-shaheed Humans should urinate at least four to six times a day, but occasionally, the pressures of modern life force us to clench and hold it in. How bad is this habit, and how long can our bodies withstand it? Heba Shaheed takes us inside the bladder to find out. Lesson by Heba Shaheed, animation by Artrak Studio.

How sugar affects the brain - Nicole Avena

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-sugar-affects-the-brain-nicole-avena When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine -- an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. Lesson by Nicole Avena, animation by STK Films.

How does asthma work? - Christopher E. Gaw

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-asthma-work-christopher-e-gaw More than 300 million people around the world suffer from asthma, and around 250,000 people die from it each year. But why do people get asthma, and how can this disease be deadly? Christopher E. Gaw describes the main symptoms and treatments of asthma. Lesson by Christopher E. Gaw, animation by Zedem Media.

What causes cavities? - Mel Rosenberg

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-causes-cavities-mel-rosenberg When a team of archeologists recently came across some 15,000-year-old human remains, they made an interesting discovery: the teeth of those ancient humans were riddled with holes. So what causes cavities, and how can we avoid them? Mel Rosenberg takes us inside our teeth to find out. Lesson by Mel Rosenberg, animation by Andrew Foerster.

Can you solve "Einstein’s Riddle"? - Dan Van der Vieren

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-einstein-s-riddle-dan-van-der-vieren View all the clues here: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-einstein-s-riddle-dan-van-der-vieren#digdeeper Before he turned physics upside down, a young Albert Einstein supposedly showed off his genius by devising a complex riddle involving a stolen exotic fish and a long list of suspects. Can you resist tackling a brain teaser written by one of the smartest people in history? Dan Van der Vieren shows how. Lesson by Dan Van der Vieren, animation by Artrake Studio.

What would happen if you didn’t sleep? - Claudia Aguirre

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-would-happen-if-you-didn-t-sleep-claudia-aguirre In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep. Lesson by Claudia Aguirre, animation by TED-Ed.

Can you solve the three gods riddle? - Alex Gendler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-the-three-gods-riddle-alex-gendler You and your team have crash-landed on an ancient planet. Can you appease the three alien overlords who rule it and get your team safely home? Created by logician Raymond Smullyan, and popularized by his colleague George Boolos, this riddle has been called the hardest logic puzzle ever. Alex Gendler shows how to solve it. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.